Stars, moons, and Jewish policeman

 Today was a good day. It did not start out that way, since after my 9:30 Jewish history class we were invited to a guest lecture by a reknown historian, most of which went way over my head. The rest of the attendees were either grad students in the field of Jewish history, or were Jewish themselves, which tended to help their understanding. Then I had a 2:00 class on Mexican history from the 1920s onwards, which I spent frantically writing down (misspelled) names and dates and generally getting things muddled up. 

But, then the sun came out and the birds started singing and all was well with the world, metaphorically speaking at least. I had spotted a flyer advertising the Doe Library Story Hour (every month a writer comes to Berkeley to read from his or her work and field questions and sign books afterwards). Today’s writer happened to be Michael Chabon (of The Amazing Adventures of Kavelier and Clay and The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, among others). I went, stood in line for a long time (the line stretched halfway across the library), found a spot, and was enthralled for a little under an hour. See, I had started reading The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, but put it away because I had to do a lot of reading for my Jewish history class and all that Judaism was getting a bit heavy. But the way Chabon read his work aloud (he actually read from a different book, but whatever) and the nice and charming and engaging way he handled the questions afterwards really make me want to go back to it. And I probably will, as soon as I finish the book I’m reading now.

Also, if I ever make it as a published writer, and I get to go on a booktour or do readings somewhere, I hope I can do it with half as much grace and humor as Chabon did. It’s always such an inspiring experience to see *real, live* authors, and find out they’re real people. It reinforces the tiny, tiny idea (well, big idea, tiny bit of confidence) that I might be in that spot one day. 

Oh well, if that doesn’t work out, maybe I can be the one introducing the writer before he reads. Shoot for the moon, right? Even if you miss, you’ll still land among the stars.

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9 thoughts on “Stars, moons, and Jewish policeman

  1. Anonymous says:

    Lotte
    I’m getting rather curious about the anonymous comments here…lol…
    anyway, I think I would love bookreadings, although I’ve never been to one. But it sounds great 🙂

  2. Anonymous says:

    Lotte
    I’m getting rather curious about the anonymous comments here…lol…
    anyway, I think I would love bookreadings, although I’ve never been to one. But it sounds great 🙂

  3. Anonymous says:

    Lotte
    I’m getting rather curious about the anonymous comments here…lol…
    anyway, I think I would love bookreadings, although I’ve never been to one. But it sounds great 🙂

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